“Keep Your Eye on the Sparrow”

by Bill Chuck on January 30, 2013

There will always be cheaters and as a result it’s time to make the PED punishment stiffer.

The aftermath of yesterday’s news about the latest PED scandal is that there are numerous people who are quoting the theme from Baretta, the 1970s detective show which contained the lyrics, “Don’t do the crime if you can’t do the time.”

While there are those in the union who feel that that fear of being caught is sufficient, which is why they willingly increased the PED testing, it is not enough of a deterrent for those players with their misguided need to cheat or with the hubris to further damage the game for their own glorification.

Nine to Know

Here are my proposals for penalties. They are designed to both punish and ostracize the player as well as provide relief to the team that he let down. I look forward to reading your comments.

  1. Any player officially determined to have been “caught” by MLB, the first penalty is a one-calendar year suspension from the date of the conviction.
  2. Players under suspension will receive no remuneration, no insurance, no access to team facilities, no access to team personnel.
  3. Players will immediately and permanently lose eligibility for any postseason awards (MVP, Cy Young Award, Gold Glove, Silver Slugger, etc.).
  4. Players will immediately and permanently lose eligibility for the All-Star Game, the World Baseball Classic, Olympic Games, and any other honorary team participation.
  5. Players will immediately and permanently lose eligibility for the Hall of Fame.
  6. For minor league players, the first penalty will be two years and all the additional disqualifications.
  7. Teams have the option throughout the time of the suspension to declare their contract with the player null and void. Decisions must be announced no later than two weeks prior to the end of the suspension.
  8. Any player found guilty may be subject to a minimum of 26 drug tests per year throughout their professional career.
  9. Second time found guilty, the player would be permanently suspended from organized baseball.

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