Waiting for the next A-Rod video..his retirement statement

by Bill Chuck on January 29, 2013

It’s time for Alex Rodriguez to retire…for the good of the game and for his own health.

Maybe I’m jumping ahead of myself but in the coming weeks the sports world will be talking about the article that broke this morning in the Miami New Times that indicates that a Miami version of BALCO has been operating.

In the article you will read about:

An all-star roster of professional athletes with Miami ties: San Francisco Giants outfielder Melky Cabrera, Oakland A’s hurler Bartolo Colón, pro tennis player Wayne Odesnik, budding Cuban superstar boxer Yuriorkis Gamboa, and Texas Rangers slugger Nelson Cruz. There’s even the New York Yankees’ $275 million man himself, Alex Rodriguez, who has sworn he stopped juicing a decade ago

Read further and you’ll find more than a dozen other baseball pros, from former University of Miami ace Cesar Carrillo to Padres catcher Yasmani Grandal to Washington Nationals star Gio Gonzalez. Notable coaches are there too, including UM baseball conditioning guru Jimmy Goins.

The names are all included in an extraordinary batch of records from Biogenesis, an anti-aging clinic tucked into a two-story office building just a hard line drive’s distance from the UM campus. They were given to New Times by an employee who worked at Biogenesis before it closed last month and its owner abruptly disappeared. The records are clear in describing the firm’s real business: selling performance-enhancing drugs, from human growth hormone (HGH) to testosterone to anabolic steroids.

This is an in-depth three month investigation and the article is extensive as it combed through “Interviews with six customers and two former employees corroborate the tale told by the patient files, the payment records, and the handwritten notebooks kept by the clinic’s chief, 49-year-old Anthony Bosch.” There are very specific notes with dates and drugs listed for numerous players.

Here are some highlights:

Yet there was his name, over and over again, logged as either “Alex Rodriguez,” “Alex Rod,” or his nickname at the clinic, “Cacique,” a pre-Columbian Caribbean chief. Rodriguez’s name appears 16 times throughout the records New Times reviewed.

Although A-Rod is the biggest name in Tony Bosch’s records, he’s far from alone. Melky Cabrera is mentioned 14 times throughout.

But there are also several prominent professionals in Bosch’s records who have never before been linked to steroid use. According to his July 2012 client sheet, Bosch sold $4,000 of product to Nelson Cruz, whom he nicknames “Mohamad.” Cruz, the power-hitting Dominican outfielder for the Texas Rangers, has whacked 130 bombs in his eight-year career without any links to performance-enhancing drugs. Until now. Bosch writes in his 2012 book: “Need to call him, go Thur to Texas, take meds from April 5-May 5, will owe him troches and… and will infuse them in May.”

There’s also the curious case of Gio Gonzalez, the 27-year-old, Hialeah-native, left-handed hurler who won 21 games last year for the Washington Nationals. Gonzalez’s name appears five times in Bosch’s notebooks, including a specific note in the 2012 book reading, “Order 1.c.1 with Zinc/MIC/… and Aminorip. For Gio and charge $1,000.” (Aminorip is a muscle-building protein.)

ESPN.com has more

Major League Baseball is investigating multiple wellness clinics in South Florida, as well as individuals with potential ties to players, armed with the belief that the region stretching 50 miles south from Boca Raton to Miami is “ground zero” for performance-enhancing drugs still filtering into the game.

“Outside the Lines” has learned that MLB security officials have spent considerable time in South Florida since last summer, monitoring clinics believed to be linked to the sale of human growth hormone and testosterone to players. MLB officials hope law enforcement will subpoena clinic records to determine whether players received illegal and banned substances.

VIDEO: A-Rod admits using steroids

VIDEO: A-Rod denies using steroids

On last grab from the New Times article:

What does it all add up to? Former Biogenesis employees say there’s no mystery why these athletes appear in Bosch’s records. “He sold HGH and steroids,” says the clinic’s former secretary. “Everyone who worked there knew that was what our business was.”

 

VIDEO: A-Rod announces his retirement

Still to come

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