Don’t call the All-Star break, “the end of the season’s first half”

by Bill Chuck on July 12, 2013

Well, they’ve now messed up the “before the break stats.” While there has never been consistency, the All-Star break is no longer anything close to the end of the first half of the season

Unlike steroid users who selfishly destroyed historical stats, this aberration was committed by the Commissioner’s scheduling team that starts the season early and has a late break.

Let me show you what I mean.

  • The 1963 version of the Texas Rangers were called the Washington Senators. At the All-Star break which began July 8, their record was 30-56 – 86 down, 76 to go.
  • The 1973  Texas Rangers at the All-Star break which began July 23, their record was 34-61, 95 down, 67 to go.
  • The 1983  Texas Rangers at the All-Star break which began July 5, their record was 44-34, 88 down, 74 to go.
  • The 1993  Texas Rangers at the All-Star break which began July 13, their record was 44-42., 86 down, 76 to go
  • The 2003  Texas Rangers at the All-Star break which began July 15, their record was 38-55, 93 down 69 to go.
  • The 2013  Texas Rangers at the All-Star break will begin July 15, they will have played 95 games and have just 67 games left to the season that began March 31.

Going back to the pre-expansion era

  • The 1933 All-Star Game was played July 6. The Boston Red Sox had a record of 31-42, 73 down, 81 to go.
  • The 1943 All-Star Game was played July 13. The Boston Red Sox had a record of 35-39, 74 down, 80 to go.
  • The 1953 All-Star Game was played July 14. The Boston Red Sox had a record of 47-39, 86 down, 68 to go.

So do us all a favor, stop telling us that someone has the most of any anything prior to the All-Star break, that is a meaningless floating “faux-toid “(a factoid that is false).

And for goodness sakes, stop referring to after the break as “the second half of the season.”

(Tip of the Hat to Eric Nadel)

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